How to Build a Barn Door with Plywood and 1×6 boards

DIY Barn Door Tips and Tricks: What Id Do Differently

We’ve had the door hanging for a full year now, because I wanted to be sure this was actually a good solution before I shared it with anyone.

Overall I LOVE my DIY sliding barn door!

But, there is one thing I want to caution you on,

But, there is one thing I want to caution you on, and also offer a solution.

If you stand directly to the side of the door, you can see that there is a bit of warping towards the bottom of the door.

The siding panel is thin and lightweight and the slight warping started within days of it being hung.

I delayed posting, because I wanted to see if it would get worse over time. It honestly hasn’t.

If you’re standing directly in front of the door, you can’t even notice it. But from the side, and when we point it out, you can see it towards the bottom.

If this bothers you, I would buy double the amount

If this bothers you, I would buy double the amount of 1″ x 4″ trim that you need for the perimeter of the door. Then attach the trim around both sides of the door and attach firmly.

This will pull your entire door together vertically and eliminate the warping.

This is also a good solution if you’re going to be using your door somewhere where you can see both sides of it.

It will give it a much more finished look!

How To Hang The Door

To hang the door, we first hung the piece of oak on the wall to attach the track to for added support. Find where the studs are and mark with a pencil above and below each stud the length of the oak support,  Find your center point and level for the oak support piece. Drill holes for the hardware to attach to the oak piece to the wall. We painted our oak the same color as the walls so it would blend in. Attach lag bolts to oak piece and secure with a cordless ratchet driver.

Once the piece is secured to the wall, you can lay out the support rail onto the oak piece. Mark the rail support holes to the oak piece. Drill a pilot hole for attaching the rail hardware to the oak. Attach top rail hardware and make sure it’s level and secure. Hang barn door onto top rail guide and check that it’s sliding properly.

Video

Apply a Base Coat of Stain

  • To achieve the look you see here, start by applying a base coat of light gold stain to the boards. Wipe off excess stain with a rag.
    • Pro tip: We applied the stain with a mini roller to speed up the process.

Fasten the Rails

  • Mark the height of the rails on the door and attach them with construction adhesive and nails.
  • Since the fasteners show, we decided to use 1-1/2-in. wrought-head nails. Because the nails protruded slightly from the opposite side, we shortened them a bit by holding them with locking pliers and grinding off the tips on a bench grinder.
    • Pro tip: You could also mount a metal grinding wheel in your angle grinder.
  • Drill pilot holes for the nails that are near the ends of the rails to avoid splitting the wood. If you don’t mind the appearance of screw heads on the opposite side of the door, you could flip the door over and drive 1-1/4-in. screws through the boards into the rails for a little more strength.
    • Pro tip: If you prefer, you could brush on a coat of flat polyurethane. Test the finish on a scrap to see if you like it before you apply it to your door. We didn’t put a finish on our door.

Closet Sliding Barn Doors With Windows

Houseful of Handmade 

Adding barn doors to a bedroom closet is an instant way to add more character to the room. This sliding option is a great alternative to a tight space that uses bifold or mirrored closet doors. It’s a simple clean design with added windows on top, which really make it stand apart.

Closet Sliding Barn Doors with Windows from Houseful of Handmade

14 Steps to Building Your Own Sliding Barn Doors

Overview

Gregory Nemec

Plan for a 2 day project:

  • Day 1: Build the door (Steps 2-10).
  • Day 2: Hang the door (Step 11-13)

Before you begin, measure the width of the door from the outside edges of the casing, then order a hardware kit with a track twice that width.

Double Pantry Barn Door

Designing Vibes 

This DIY barn door plan gets rid of some boring bi-fold doors that lead into a pantry. There wasn’t room for the sliding barn door hardware, so two narrow doors were added with accents that give them a barn door feel. Common boards and simple hardware make the cost of this DIY project more affordable.

Double Pantry Barn Door from Designing Vibes

Tools Materials

  • Tape measure

    Tape measure

  • Miter saw

    Miter saw

  • Bar clamps

    Bar clamps

  • Drill/driver

    Drill/driver

  • Speed clamps

    Speed clamps

  • Straight edge

    Straight edge

  • Combination square

    Combination square

  • Pneumatic nailer

    Pneumatic nailer

  • Caulk gun

    Caulk gun

  • Pocket hole jig

    Pocket hole jig

  • drill bit - 1/8-inch

    drill bit – 1/8-inch

  • Cotton rag

    Cotton rag

  • Small paintbrush

    Small paintbrush

  • Stud finder

    Stud finder

  • drill bit - 5/16 inch

    drill bit – 5/16 inch

  • socket wrench - 3/8-inch

    socket wrench – 3/8-inch

  • level - 2-foot

    level – 2-foot

Build the Door

The first thing I did was layout my 5 pieces of 1×6 boards side by side butted up against each other. I didn’t have to cut any of these pieces, but if your opening is not 8ft, you will need to measure and cut accordingly. I added a little bit of wood glue between each piece to give the door stability.

Then I measured the width and cut the top cross tr

Then I measured the width and cut the top cross trim piece from the 1×4.

I applied some wood glue to the back of this piece

I applied some wood glue to the back of this piece.

And nailed it into place. I try to use as few nail

And nailed it into place. I try to use as few nails as possible in this type of project. Less nails means fewer holes to fill and sand. I repeated these steps for the bottom cross trim piece.

Then I measured the distance between the top and b

Then I measured the distance between the top and bottom trim pieces. And used this length to measure and cut the side trim pieces from the 1×4’s.

I used the same glue and nailing process on the si

I used the same glue and nailing process on the side pieces.

Once I had the face of the door trimmed. It was ti

Once I had the face of the door trimmed. It was time to do the edge trim. Using the length and width measurements of the door to this point, I cut the edge trim pieces. The top piece was cut on a 45 degree angle on both ends. The side pieces were cut on a 45 only on one end.

Once I had all three pieces cut, it was time to gl

Once I had all three pieces cut, it was time to glue and nail them into place.

And that’s it! A barn door in 30 minutes. It

And that’s it! A barn door in 30 minutes. It only required a total of 8 cuts.

Of course, once you have it constructed, you will need to fill the holes, sand and paint it, and hang it. To hang it, you can follow the instructions found in the barn door hardware kit you choose.

Here another shot of the completed barn door in our master bathroom.

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