How to Install a Ceiling Fan Where No Fixture Exists

1

Turn off the circuit breaker at the breaker panel that provides power to the ceiling fan circuit. Test the wiring on the switches for the ceiling fan using a noncontact circuit tester to be certain that the power is off.

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Knock out the old box and install a fan brace

Shut off the power at the main panel and remove th

Shut off the power at the main panel and remove the light fixture. Knock the existing electrical box free of the framing with a hammer and a block of wood, then pull the electrical cable free of the old box and through the ceiling hole. Leave the old ceiling fan junction box in the ceiling cavity unless you can easily remove it through the hole.

Tip: Before you blast out the box, bend back the plastic clamps or loosen the metal cable clamps so it’ll be easier to pull the electrical cable free after the box is loosened.

Connect the light pod and radio receiver

Place the radio receiver into the switch housing/l

Place the radio receiver into the switch housing/light pod assembly and connect the light pod wires according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Note the settings on the receiver’s code toggles so you can dial in the same settings on the electronic controls at the wall switch. Now loosen the screws in the switch-housing hub halfway. Plug the motor ceiling fan wiring into the receptacle on the receiver and twist the switch housing into place on the hub. Retighten the screws.

2. Switching the Light and Using the Pull Chain for the Fan(Single Switch)

This method and the following are the most commonly used. They only require a single light switch. Many older homes never gave any thought to wiring up a second switch. Mostly, this happened because homes didn’t have a powered ceiling fan. As a result, many homeowners must use a single switch to control the light and/or both aspects of their ceiling fans. The wiring for this type of electrical connection looks like this:

As you can see, we switched the hot line going to the light kit by inserting the switch. Many people use simple 12/2 (Romex) with a ground wire to make this loop. If you do this, wrap black electrical tape around the exposed white wire. This indicates (to you or anyone else who works on the circuit in the future) that it is indeed a “hot” wire and not a neutral line.

While we show a small strip of electrical tape, we recommend actually wrapping it around all the exposed white wire. Note that we opted to wire the fan motor directly to the power source. That lets us use the fan’s pull string to turn it on and off. This also keeps the fan usable regardless of the position of the wall switch. Make your connections for the neutral and ground wires, and you’re all set.

3

Install the ceiling fan mounting plate to the electrical box in the ceiling using the two mounting screws supplied in the ceiling fan kit and a screwdriver. Feed the black, white, red and copper wires through the hole in the center of the mounting plate.

Choosing Where to Install Your Ceiling Fan

The two big questions you must answer before installing a ceiling fan are where you want to install it and how you’ll be supplying power to that location. Factors to consider will vary depending on if you’re installing a new fan, replacing an old one, or retrofitting an old light fixture.

  • Existing Fans or Retrofit: If you’re replacing an existing fan or light fixture, your decision on where to install your new fan is easy. You’ll want to carefully disassemble the fixture, beginning with light bulbs and decorative glass. Remove the screws holding the light fixture to the electrical box, then disconnect the plastic wiring connectors to remove the fixture completely. If you’re lucky, the electrical box will be installed directly to a ceiling joist. That means you’ll be able to bracket your fan to the joist to give it the support it needs. If the electrical box is installed between two joists, you’ll need to install a support bar that is rated for fan support.
  • New Fan Installations: When installing a fan where no fixture exists, you have the same options for structural support: either bracket the fan directly to a ceiling joist or install a support bar between joists. The greater challenge will be choosing the best solution for supplying power, which is usually the method that requires the least amount of drywall cutting. With attic access to the installation site, homeowners who are experienced with electrical rewiring can route new wiring from any electrical access point in the attic. If there is no such access, wiring should be routed from the nearest outlet or switch, which is usually a wall switch in the room where the fan is being installed. This will often require one or more small holes to be cut in the drywall so that the wiring can be routed around corners.

Optimal Sizing, Speed, and Placement

Use this formula to find the best fan size for a room’s occupied space (the part of the room where people gather the most): Occupied space (in square feet) divided by 4 equals the blade span (in inches). Step blade span down a bit for rooms with low ceilings, and go wider if the ceilings are high.

Another good rule of thumb is to remember that blade spans of less than 36 inches are ideal for spaces smaller than 75 square feet, such as baths and breakfast nooks. Spans of 36 to 42 inches work in rooms of up to 225 square feet, like a dining room. Larger living rooms and bedrooms can handle 50- to 54-inch blades.

Make sure that the cubic feet of air that the fan moves per minute (cfm), measured at high speed, is near the top of its class. Some 52-inch fans, for instance, rate as low as 2,050 cfm, while others reach 7,800. High-cfm fans not only provide a better breeze, they usually have robust motors that will last longer and run more quietly.

For optimal performance, the fan should be hung at least 1 1/2 feet from the wall or a sloped ceiling, 7- to 10-feet from the floor, and at least 8 inches from the ceiling. Steer clear of hanging the fan too close to any lights, as rotating blades under a bulb will create an annoying flicker.

Follow the manufacturer’s directions to install the adjustable hanger bar and ceiling box



You install most hanger bars by pushing them thr

You install most hanger bars by pushing them through the hole in the ceiling left by the old electrical box. When you have the hanger bar completely through the hole, rotate it until it’s perpendicular to the ceiling joists. The bar expands until it engages the ceiling joists. The ends of the hanger bar are equipped with sharp steel pins that dig into the wood joists when the hanger bar is expanded. You then attach the special ceiling box to the hanger bar, locking it in place to provide a secure base for the fan.

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Thats All, Folks!

Hopefully, this guide will get you on your way to installing a ceiling fan and making all of the required electrical connections to get it up and running smoothly. A ceiling fan makes a great addition to almost any room. It’s one of the easiest projects to complete and really makes an impact in your home. It can also make you look and feel like a real handyman.

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